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A Bay View

The Coastal Bay area on the Wild Atlantic Way

Head South from Erris in County Mayo to Connemara in Galway where the sky meets the water in a dramatic landscape of bays, loughs, bogland, rocky outcrops with water abounding. Take in the vastness of Clew Bay near the Georgian town of Westort along your way.


Secluded beach on one of the 365 islands in Clew Bay, County Mayo on the Irish West Coast.
Get Clewed In

They say that there is an island in Clew Bay, Co. Mayo, for every day of the year! Hike to the top of Croagh Patrick, Ireland's pilgrim mountain standing 764 metres from sea level. From here you have the most commanding view of the bay in all its glory, well on a good day anyway.


Take a cruise and visit some of the uninhabited island around Clew Bay. View the large seal colony, beautiful secret beaches and breathtaking views that stretch as far as the eye can see along the west Mayo coast.

Large, brightly painted pub and restaurant in the centre of Westport town, County Mayo, Ireland
Westport

Westport has to be one of Ireland's top destinations. Colourful, energetic and oozing with culture, the pubs and restaurants are some of the best in the country.


Catch a traditional session in Matt Molloy's, a world famous bar named after and owned by the renowned Chieftains flautist. Head for a pinjt in McGing's, Westport’s oldest pub, a popular spot for blow-ins and locals alike. Catch a jazz band, a folk band, or quiet afternoon with a roaring fire.

Solo cyclist on the Greenway, a dedicated cycle route from Westport to Achill Island in Co.Mayo.
The Green Way

Get away from the stresses of urban living and ride the multi-award-winning Great Western Greenway, Ireland's longest off-road cycling and walking trail. Built on the disused Westport to Achill railway line which closed in1937, the 42km route is almost entirely traffic-free and is the perfect destination for getting out on a bike for a spin.


Visitors who intend on completing the route with young children should be aware that there are two short sections of the main road, near Newport and Achill, that need to be cycled on.

The diamond mountain and a path with purple heather in the Connemara National Park, Galway.
Connemara National Park

Connemara National Park, situated in Co. Galway on the Irish West Coast, covers some 2,000 hectares of rugged mountains, expansive bog land, heaths, grasslands and native woodlands. The peaks of Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, make part of the famous Twelve Bens Range. It's one of Ireland's oldest National Parks, established and opened to the public way back in in 1980.


A large section of park lands was owned by the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the Letterfrack Industrial School which is now a busy Furniture college, part of Galway/Mayo Institute of Technology. Nowadays, the Park lands are owned and managed solely by the State for National Park purpose.

A view from the Connemara Nation Park overlooking Inisbofin Island on a mizzly day.
The Islands

No trip to Connemara is complete without visiting Inisbofin. The island has been inhabited since 8000 – 4000 B.C. Early Christian Times see the first documented history and as you sail around the tower and signal light into the harbour, you'll see the Cromwellian 16th Century Barracks.


Believe it or not, there are five restaurants and four bars on this tiny island to choose from (only in Ireland!), each offering its own unique blend of cooking.The island also has its own food festival; Bia Bo Finne which takes place on the first weekend of October annually.

City of Tribes

Galway is fondly known as the City of Tribes. It's a reference to the fourteen tribes or the fourteen merchant families who once dominated Galway when it was a small town between the mid-13th and late 19th centuries.


The city is also famous for the Galway Hooker, a traditional fishing boat with distinctive orange sails, used in Galway Bay off the west coast of Ireland. It was designed and built to deal with the strong winds and seas found there.

The city is also famous for the Galway Hooker, a traditional fishing boat with distinctive orange sails, used in Galway Bay off the west coast of Ireland. It was designed and built to deal with the strong winds and seas found there